WHILE THE OVATION IS LOUDEST

While the Ovation is Loudest

There is a common saying among people that one should leave the stage while the ovation is loudest. Is it wise to leave the stage when you should be enjoying the moment? This question keeps lingering in my heart anytime I hear that statement. Most people will agree that it is a coward act to shy out of a stage so why tell me to leave the stage when I should be enjoying the ovation.
Remember an ovation is given to only those who are deserving, brilliant and have mastered their art, so why should they leave when they ought to be enjoying the moment?

I remember Mr Audu who was to speak at an event few years ago, he got the invite through a colleague who trust his delivery of any given topic in the field of Finance. Mr Audu started making research and gathering his content to deliver a top notch speech he’s known for at the event, as usual he highlighted the basic and important point for discussion. He got to the event well dressed and with a smiling face, after being introduced to the sitting audience consisting of business experts and notable individuals, the speaker developed a cold feet, Gosh! He can’t afford to “misyarn” in the midst of those seated.

He got on stage to deliver his content, he did this with absolute brilliance and coordinated composure, silence rented the hall, pens were moving on papers, the spectators could not afford to lose a drop from the well of knowledge embodied in Mr Audu. In between the speech he was been applauded for given practical solutions to industrial problems, his coordination and method of delivery were duly appreciated with loud claps but he’s not done with his speech.

If you are Mr Audu, will you leave the stage at that moment?

Sometimes, ovations aren’t an appreciation but a way to show the speaker or engager that we are tired of your jargons. I remember a lecturer in my undergraduate days who was poor at his delivery on one very hot afternoon in the lecture theater, my mates didn’t hesitate to clap for him, it wasn’t a clap of appreciation but one to show our displeasure with his delivery which was obviously poor.

Would you have left the stage if you were Mr Lecturer?

Guess what, my lecturer didn’t leave the stage even though he was obviously embarrassed by the show of stupidity by myself and my mates.
Mr lecturer restrategized and gave a master piece in the last 30minutes of the lecture, he passed a well calculated joke on we the learners and in no time we forgot his earlier show of shame while laughing like one who bought a comedy ticket. After then, he continued his Lecture but this time in a more interesting and practical manner.

What would have happened to his self esteem if he had left the stage?

If youre on stage and the ovation is at it loudest stage, keep calm, enjoy the moment and deliver even a better show.

Olowo Saheed

43 thoughts on “WHILE THE OVATION IS LOUDEST

  1. Well expounded Sir
    The lecturer,took control of the situation knowing well the attitude created by the student to drive him off the podium.
    While the ovation is loudest take control!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nice write-ups. I love the way you philosophically scribbled this down. This is always my view. As in, I don’t like to follow all these “wise saying” hook, line and sinker. You have really done well.

    However, there is still much room for improvement. You can write it to be in standard of well known grammarian. It is not impossible.
    Barakallahu fihi

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Well said. Each situation determines the what and worth of the action.

    Act according to the situation. Either to leave or to stay. The best thing is the make the RIGHT HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Why leave the stage? Enjoy the moment even when you know you don’t deserve the ovation just don’t kill your self esteem by bowing down. Nice one sir

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Wow.. I love this piece. Quitting when you’re suppose to either enjoy the ovation or restrategize isn’t really the best option. Nice one dear.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Great perspective.

    Having spoken on different stages myself, I can tell you it’s sweet to leave the stage when the ovation is loudest, after you have concluded your speech. I think that’s the purpose of the statement. The issue with general statements like this is that, they may be correct, but never factor in exceptions. That is why one must be wise enough to know what works for him . Whether the ovation is loud or not, the audience you have truly impacted would never forget you.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. So thoughtful of you…You don’t leave when the ovation is loudest because it might not be positive applause.. Thanks for the eye opener.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Well said and I agree with you. What I would like to add is, a speaker should be confident, know his audience, know how best to deliver his speech and have stage control. These will let you know what the ovation is meant for. But as for me, if you are done with your speech it’s best to leave the stage when the ovation is loud.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. What a nice piece! Very philosophical and Maverick. It shows the writer has an independent way of thinking that is unusual and not diluted with opinions of the multitudes. However, I think the artistic composition needs more work!!! Ride on!✌️

    Liked by 1 person

  10. A loud of applause for this interesting piece of art sir… This is not an applause like the one for Mr lecturer, it’s the one for Mr Audu! Thanks sir for this piece of art.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. This is surely an article I learnt something from. Irrespective of the applause it is better to stay grounded and leave when the ovation is loudest.

    Liked by 1 person

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